5 Helpful Xamarin Developer Tips

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So you are building your next native cross-platform mobile app using Xamarin.Forms? Good for you! You get the benefits of a single C#/XAML codebase that targets all mobile platforms and customize the user experience on each.

The right UI toolset can also help augment your app. When you build your next Xamarin.Forms app, check out the polished controls that come bundled with Telerik UI for Xamarin. If you haven’t picked up the Telerik UI bits yet – you can always start a free trial you know. So, what’s there to lose?

As you start building your app out though, there are some very real roadblocks to overcome before your app gets functional. You need to organize your app content for optimal usage and preserve the continuity of user experience. You need to have a consistent coding strategy on a couple of fonts and minimize resource usage. Let’s get down to business – here’s my list of 5 quick developer tips on how to get around the most common roadblocks.

Full article HERE.

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The Xamarin ListView on Steroids

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It’s 2017. We have been using smartphones for over 10 years now. And with time, our expectations of sophistication from mobile apps has grown exponentially. As users, we want immediate feedback, support for all gestures and impeccable performance from apps. Keep all this in mind as you build your next cross-platform mobile app with Xamarin.

As is the case, most apps need to display a list of things. And most often, the developer’s choice of user interface control is the ubiquitous ListView. Sure you can start with the vanilla ones and build features of your own – but wouldn’t you rather focus on your app’s functionality, than sweating over perfecting the ListView’s interactivity?

Call me biased, but I prefer well-engineered polished and performant UI controls out of the box – like the cross-platform Xamarin.Forms ListView that comes with Telerik UI for Xamarin. This article dives into some advanced features of the Telerik ListView and how you could implement them easily in your apps. Your users will invariably expect all this from a modern app – will you deliver?

Full article HERE.

Flying with Xamarin and Telerik UI

Ask any developer about what code they are really proud to have written – the stories would be amazing. Maybe it is life-saving software in a healthcare system, or mission critical app in a global business or simply an open source library used freely by thousands of other developers. We software developers should take pride in our craftsmanship.

As for me, it was a WPF application – yup, I know, sounds boring. But I used to work at a private aviation company and we saw direct application of technology to aid the aviation industry.

Our application was used extensively by company dispatchers to do flight planning, tail routing and maintain operational safety. And boy – you do not want production bugs when you are flying business executives and Hollywood or sports celebrities. Glitches in our software could bring down planes and the company would probably not recover from the public relations disaster.

Sure we had some scary moments, but overall it was pride and craftsmanship in our applications that kept planes flying safely – day in and day out. I wish we had Xamarin for making cross-platform mobile apps back in those days.

This article combines two of my passions – a pure love for aviation and building connected mobile apps with Xamarin.

Full article over @ Telerik Developer Network.

Jumpstart Your Xamarin App Development

So you want to build a mobile app? Your developer zen will quickly be threatened by the plethora of ways you can go about building a modern, cross-platform mobile app today. The below illustration shows an assortment of just a few of the technologies that you can use and the most common frameworks/platforms used for each.

This is what we have done to ourselves over the last 10 years. Choice is a good thing for developers, except that too much choice can become a little crippling.

On a positive note, the choice of technology stack becomes much easier once you decide to focus on what matters most – your skills and expertise. In today’s age, you really want to build truly cross-platform mobile apps from single codebase and preferably have the app be native to each platform. If your developer background is .NET, you’ll possibly lean towards using C# with Xamarin.

Xamarin lets you to build modern cross-platform mobile apps using your .NET skills. You write C#/XAML and your code gets cross-compiled down to native bits on each platform. This article walks you through some essential tooling that you should have in your arsenal for Xamarin development, as well as how to jumpstart your app with some polished UI.

Full article over @ Telerik Developer Network.

Say Hello to Windows Hello

You come across a killer app, but it needs another set of user credentials for you to remember for authentication. Could this be the straw that breaks the camel’s back? Especially with the constant stories of widespread enterprise hacking that expose consumer data, something has to change, right?

Windows Hello offers easy biometric authentication integrated into Windows 10. Windows Hello promises seamless 2 Factor Authentication (2FA) using device and user biometrics, taking away much of the pain around managing user credentials. Has this been tried and failed in the past? Yes. But Windows Hello has a better shot at success with well-thought-out features and reusable authorization.

In this article, we’ll unpack Windows Hello to help you understand the specifics.

Full article over @ Telerik Developer Network.

Building NativeScript UI for .NET Developers

NativeScript is a framework for building cross-platform native mobile apps, with JavaScript. The ability to build cross-platform truly native apps from a single code base of JavaScript/TypeScript, XML and CSS can be exciting. As we saw in Part 1 of this series, NativeScript has a lot for .NET developers: robust Visual Studio support throughout app life cycle; easy JavaScript abstractions over native APIs; and full TypeScript support for building business logic.

Perhaps you’re not convinced yet though, with your biggest concern being user interface (UI). Surely building an abstracted, cross-platform UI cannot be easy? Maybe your background is in XAML or other UI composition markups in .NET, and you are just used to a rich developer ecosystem of tooling. These are valid concerns, but relax.

NativeScript has your back when it comes to UI composition. It combines simple markup with an abstracted platform-specific rendering. If you’re used to the richness of XAML, I think you’ll feel right at home building native UIs with NativeScript. In this article, I’ll walk you through building a NativeScript UI from a .NET developer’s perspective – I think you’ll be excited by what we find.

Read the whole article on TDN over HERE.

Adios!