Flying with Xamarin and Telerik UI

Ask any developer about what code they are really proud to have written – the stories would be amazing. Maybe it is life-saving software in a healthcare system, or mission critical app in a global business or simply an open source library used freely by thousands of other developers. We software developers should take pride in our craftsmanship.

As for me, it was a WPF application – yup, I know, sounds boring. But I used to work at a private aviation company and we saw direct application of technology to aid the aviation industry.

Our application was used extensively by company dispatchers to do flight planning, tail routing and maintain operational safety. And boy – you do not want production bugs when you are flying business executives and Hollywood or sports celebrities. Glitches in our software could bring down planes and the company would probably not recover from the public relations disaster.

Sure we had some scary moments, but overall it was pride and craftsmanship in our applications that kept planes flying safely – day in and day out. I wish we had Xamarin for making cross-platform mobile apps back in those days.

This article combines two of my passions – a pure love for aviation and building connected mobile apps with Xamarin.

Full article over @ Telerik Developer Network.


Why the Command Line? Why now?

Modern developers are often polyglots — they dabble in different operating systems, programming languages, frameworks and tools as they build the next generation of applications. On top of that, modern applications run on a variety of platforms and devices, all leading to very mixed developer skill sets and tools of the trade.

No longer are developers stuck on a platform or tooling silo — developers should be able to use any development platforms and tools of their choice to build applications. This is the new mindset, and modern application frameworks are catering to the flexibility developers want.

It is fair to say that Command Line and CLI (Command Line Interface) Tools have made a big comeback with developers, thanks to their cross-platform flexibility. Developers love CLI tools that give them the freedom to work from any operating system and pick the tools of their trade. This trend is enhanced by the fact that most development platforms these days offer CLI tools first and then add GUI tools on top of that.

Let’s take a quick look as to why CLI is enjoying resurgence amongst modern developers and what’s in it for you.

Full article over @ Telerik Developer Network.

Jumpstart Your Xamarin App Development

So you want to build a mobile app? Your developer zen will quickly be threatened by the plethora of ways you can go about building a modern, cross-platform mobile app today. The below illustration shows an assortment of just a few of the technologies that you can use and the most common frameworks/platforms used for each.

This is what we have done to ourselves over the last 10 years. Choice is a good thing for developers, except that too much choice can become a little crippling.

On a positive note, the choice of technology stack becomes much easier once you decide to focus on what matters most – your skills and expertise. In today’s age, you really want to build truly cross-platform mobile apps from single codebase and preferably have the app be native to each platform. If your developer background is .NET, you’ll possibly lean towards using C# with Xamarin.

Xamarin lets you to build modern cross-platform mobile apps using your .NET skills. You write C#/XAML and your code gets cross-compiled down to native bits on each platform. This article walks you through some essential tooling that you should have in your arsenal for Xamarin development, as well as how to jumpstart your app with some polished UI.

Full article over @ Telerik Developer Network.

Engineering the Future of .NET

While there is a huge army of engineers at Microsoft who work on .NET and C#, the following folks are arguably the most influential in bringing you the future of .NET and .NET Tooling.

  1. Scott Hunter
  2. Rich Lander
  3. Damian Edwards
  4. David Fowler
  5. Mads Kristensen
  6. Mads Torgersen

Let’s say you had an opportunity to have all of them sit down at a roundtable panel and fire away blunt honest questions. What would you ask?

This article dives into the mock questions I would ask, along with responses that are my personal best guess to the answers. Could my answers not reflect actual opinions shared by the team at Microsoft? Sure, but I’m hoping folks from the .NET team can jump in to correct me if I am way off base.

This is a rather interesting time for .NET – what’s being done shapes the future of .NET for the next decade. Let’s ask the honest questions and hopefully all of us will understand the new .NET ecosystem a little better.

Full article over @ Telerik Developer Network.

A Git CLI Reference for Beginners

Hopefully, no one needs to sell you on GitHub – the world’s largest open source community. GitHub is home for most developers – a fast flexible social environment to build personal projects, support enterprises and collaborate on open source technologies.

The underpinnings of GitHub is Git – a free, open source, cross-platform and highly productive distributed version control system. GitHub conveniently wraps all of Git’s features into polished UI tools for your chosen development platform, namely:

But you are a geek. And what appeals more to your inner nerdiness than pure text on a bland terminal window. Nothing like passer-by’s not having a clue as to what you are up to! Everything you do through the GitHub UI tools, first began life as command line tools via the the Git CLI. And it is incredibly powerful.

This article doesn’t have screenshots and memes. Instead it aims to be a straight up cheat sheet of Git CLI commands. The best news is that all of the commands work the exact same way on Linux, Mac OS/OSX and Windows.

Full article over @ Telerik Developer Network.