The Xamarin Promise – Realized!

9:00 AM | March 31 2016 | Microsoft //BUILD developer conference | Moscone West, San Francisco.

The Microsoft acquisition of Xamarin was great news; but everyone was waiting to see what all this actually meant for developers.

Microsoft chose the //BUILD conference to divulge the details. The Xamarin promise is now a reality for every Visual Studio developer and the future holds the opportunity for .NET developers to go cross-platform. This article take a 10K feet view to articulate some Xamarin history, its present and the future. Along the way, we’ll talk about some polished UI components so that you don’t have to re-invent the wheel for your cross-platform apps.

It’s a great time to be a mobile developer on Microsoft stack – let us unpack why.

Full article over @ Telerik Developer Network.

Highlights from Microsoft Build Day 1

“Developers, Developers, Developers!” Microsoft’s old war-cry for developers and renewed mojo was on full display during Day 1 of the annual //BUILD developer conference in San Francisco. Several Telerik Developer Advocates are at //BUILD this week and are just as excited as you are after the Day 1 Keynote. Here are some highlights that stood out from a developer’s standpoint.

Full article over @ Telerik Developer Network.

Biometric Authentication with Microsoft Passport

Information security is hard. Managing user authentication and authorization in apps/services usually gives developers an additional layer of headache on top of making applications actually work. Windows Hello and Microsoft Passport promise to be solid options for solving these issues.

Windows Hello offers easy biometric authentication that is integrated into Windows 10, taking away much of the pain around managing user credentials. But user authentication is just the first step of the problem. How do developers leverage biometrics to authorize users to apps/services?

That responsibility falls on Microsoft Passport – a seamless 2 Factor Authentication (2FA) system using device and user biometrics. Reusable user credentials can finally be replaced by biometrics and hardware-level security, thus enabling apps/services to offer robust built-in security.

This article unpacks Microsoft Passport and offers a walkthrough of how to utilize Microsoft Passport to power your apps. Seamless biometric security is wonderful, especially when you have the ability to leverage it in your apps. Let’s dive in.

Full article over @ Telerik Developer Network.

Say Hello to Windows Hello

You come across a killer app, but it needs another set of user credentials for you to remember for authentication. Could this be the straw that breaks the camel’s back? Especially with the constant stories of widespread enterprise hacking that expose consumer data, something has to change, right?

Windows Hello offers easy biometric authentication integrated into Windows 10. Windows Hello promises seamless 2 Factor Authentication (2FA) using device and user biometrics, taking away much of the pain around managing user credentials. Has this been tried and failed in the past? Yes. But Windows Hello has a better shot at success with well-thought-out features and reusable authorization.

In this article, we’ll unpack Windows Hello to help you understand the specifics.

Full article over @ Telerik Developer Network.

.NET Developers – Love Thy Command Line

For the last decade, Windows or .NET developers using Visual Studio have been shielded from the command line. Why do we need command line tools when just about everything needed for app development is right there in Visual Studio? Simply use the extensive IDE menu options or the right-click to access additional operations through the context menus. As a result, command line tooling has often been thought of as counter productive and meant for the über geeks.

But are rich IDEs making developers lazy? Why do we depend on having a UI to perform even the simplest of tasks? Do you keep hearing people boast of the power and flexibility of the command line? Or of features that you just cannot invoke from your IDE? Relax – the command line isn’t difficult to use. With a little practice, you can master the art and have a lot of power at your disposal.

The new .NET is lean, modular and cross-platform with a much lower barrier to entry. And since developers can now choose any IDE and OS of their choice, the commonality between Windows, OSX and Linux becomes the command line. Command line tooling for .NET works the same way on any platform.

This article distills down the most common and useful command line tooling for the new .NET. We’ll dispense with any cat pictures and funny memes and focus on just creating a straight up developer cheat sheet for .NET command line tooling.

Full article over at Telerik Developer Network.

The Era of Portable .NET

The .NET framework has had quite the journey from conception until today. Yet, every iteration from .NET 1.0 to .NET 4.5, almost invariably required kittens to die, as you painstakingly upgraded your apps and the .NET runtimes. The challenge, in part, was because of the giant monolithic .NET framework that all your apps depended on.

All that changes moving forward.

The new .NET framework is modern, lean, modular and open source. No longer is .NET a system-wide installation – it is merely a folder. Instead of a huge underlying framework, you only pick and choose the pieces of the .NET framework that you need in your apps. And more importantly, you can package the required components of the .NET framework right alongside your app. We’re entering an age of app-runtime silos and ultimate portability.

This article shows you .NET’s portability with modern ASP.NET web applications.

Read the whole article on TDN over HERE.

Adios!